Prayer on grace

There are a lot of Bible verses on grace that give us insight into God’s grace toward us as Christians. Grace in the New Testament comes from the Greek word charis and means good will, loving-kindness, and favour, which is often unmerited.

It speaks of God’s mercy to us and his love for us. Whether looking to study God’s grace for self-reflection or to find a verse about his grace for a greeting card or personal letter, you have come to the right place.

We have diligently searched the Scriptures to find some of the best Scriptures about grace.

20 Scriptures on Grace

1.

“”For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God,”

2.

“But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble.”

3.

“And are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,”

4.

“Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.”

5.

“As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as good stewards of God’s varied grace”

6.

7.

“Grace be with all who love our Lord Jesus Christ with love incorruptible.”

8.

“Now may our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God our Father, who loved us and gave us eternal comfort and good hope through grace”

9.

“You then, my child, be strengthened by the grace that is in Christ Jesus,”

10.

“so that being justified by his grace we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life.”

11.

“For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you by his poverty might become rich.”

12.

“But the free gift is not like the trespass. For if many died through one man’s trespass, much more have the grace of God and the free gift by the grace of that one man Jesus Christ abounded for many.”

13.

“to the praise of his glorious grace, with which he has blessed us in the Beloved.”

14.

“And God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that having all sufficiency in all things at all times, you may abound in every good work.”

15.

“For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation for all people,”

16.

“Grace, mercy, and peace will be with us, from God the Father and from Jesus Christ the Father’s Son, in truth and love.”

17.

“But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me.”

18.

“May grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.”

19.

But if it is by grace, it is no longer on the basis of works; otherwise grace would no longer be grace.”

20.

“But he said to me, My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness. Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me.””

prayer on grace

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Grace in the Bible

These Bible verses on grace reveal a lot about the grace of God and how it is obtained. Grace is given to us when we humble ourselves before God and it is given to us during times of need to strengthen us and help us endure affliction.

Sometimes grace comes through sacrifice such as in the case of Jesus coming to earth to die so that we might be saved. And it is through grace as a gift that we are saved and justified through Jesus Christ, receiving eternal comfort and the love of God.

It is by grace that we have received different spiritual gifts to benefit the body of Christ. Grace comes from God the Father, the Holy Spirit, and Jesus Christ.

Paul attributes his own salvation and mission as a result of the grace of God. Understanding that grace so well, he often uses the grace from God as a blessing in his letters.

Feel free to share these Scriptures about Grace with your friends, family and congregation!

Add a Bible Verse or Comment

www.praywithme.com

Grace is a name for any of a number of short prayers said or an unvoiced intention held prior to partaking of a meal, thanking deity and/or the entities that have given of themselves to furnish nutrients to those partaking in the meal. Some traditions hold that grace and thanksgiving imparts a blessing which in some traditions is held to sanctify or make sacred the meal. In the English language tradition, reciting a prayer prior to eating is traditionally referred to as “saying grace”.

A prayer of Grace is said to be an act of offering thanks to God for granting humans dominion over the earth and the right and ability to sacrifice the lives of divine creations for sustenance; this thanks is the “saying of Grace” prior to and/or after eating of any meal.

If one is not religious and the rest of the table is saying grace, it is considered to be polite and culturally appropriate to quietly observe or just bow one’s head. It is often considered impolite or incorrect to start eating before grace has been said and completed.

The saying of grace as a meme and religious practice may have entered into the English language Judeo-Christian cultures with the Jewish mealtime prayer Birkat Hamazon, though any number of cultures may have informed the practice or it may have arisen spontaneously by individuals and then perpetuated in family traditions and social institutions.

The transignification, transubstantiation, ganachakra and agape feasts may have informed the practice of grace.

The American tradition of Thanksgiving

In American Christianity the head of the household often ad libs a special grace on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter while the others observe a moment of silence. In some households it is customary for all at the table to hold hands during the grace.

Typical Christian grace prayers

* Ecumenical. “God is great, God is good. Let us thank Him for our food. Amen.”
* Protestant. “Come, Lord Jesus, be our guest, and let these gifts to us be blessed. Amen.”
* Catholic. “Let us pray! Bless us, O Lord, and these, Thy/Your gifts, which we are about to receive from Thy/Your bounty. Through Christ, our Lord. Amen.”
* Catholic (Latin). “Nos oremus! Benedic, Domine, nos et hæc Tua dona, quæ de Tua largitate sumus sumpturi. Per Christum, Dominum nostrum. Amen.”
* Catholic (German). “Lass’t uns beten! Segne, Herr, uns und diese deine Gaben, die wir von deiner Großmut essen werden. Durch Christus, unseren Herr’n. Amen.”
* Eastern Orthodox. “O Christ God, bless the food and drink of Thy servants, for holy art Thou, always, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” The one saying the prayer may make the Sign of the Cross over the food with his right hand. After the meal, all stand and sing: “We thank Thee, O Christ our God, that Thou hast satisfied us with Thine earthly gifts; deprive us not of Thy heavenly kingdom, but as Thou camest among Thy disciples, O Saviour, and gavest them peace, come unto us and save us.” syrup.” Hence only bread made of wheat (which embraces spelt) or of barley (which for this purpose includes rye and oats) is deemed worthy of the blessing commanded in verse 10.

After the meal, a series of four (originally three) benedictions are said, or a single benediction if bread was not eaten

Other pre-meal sayings

In Japan it is customary to put one’s hands together and say “Itadakimasu” (‘receive’ humble) before a meal.

Muslims say Bismillah ar-Rahman, ar-Raheem.

Notes

ee also

*grace
*Wilderness Grace

External links

* from The Prayer Guide.
* aricle from “The Catholic Encyclopedia”.
* article from “The Catholic Encyclopedia”.
* .

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

en.academic.ru

Grace is a name for any of a number of short prayers said or an unvoiced intention held prior to partaking of a meal, thanking deity and/or the entities that have given of themselves to furnish nutrients to those partaking in the meal. Some traditions hold that grace and thanksgiving imparts a blessing which in some traditions is held to sanctify or make sacred the meal. In the English language tradition, reciting a prayer prior to eating is traditionally referred to as “saying grace”.

A prayer of Grace is said to be an act of offering thanks to God for granting humans dominion over the earth and the right and ability to sacrifice the lives of divine creations for sustenance; this thanks is the “saying of Grace” prior to and/or after eating of any meal.

If one is not religious and the rest of the table is saying grace, it is considered to be polite and culturally appropriate to quietly observe or just bow one’s head. It is often considered impolite or incorrect to start eating before grace has been said and completed.

The saying of grace as a meme and religious practice may have entered into the English language Judeo-Christian cultures with the Jewish mealtime prayer Birkat Hamazon, though any number of cultures may have informed the practice or it may have arisen spontaneously by individuals and then perpetuated in family traditions and social institutions.

The transignification, transubstantiation, ganachakra and agape feasts may have informed the practice of grace.

The American tradition of Thanksgiving

In American Christianity the head of the household often ad libs a special grace on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter while the others observe a moment of silence. In some households it is customary for all at the table to hold hands during the grace.

Typical Christian grace prayers

* Ecumenical. “God is great, God is good. Let us thank Him for our food. Amen.”
* Protestant. “Come, Lord Jesus, be our guest, and let these gifts to us be blessed. Amen.”
* Catholic. “Let us pray! Bless us, O Lord, and these, Thy/Your gifts, which we are about to receive from Thy/Your bounty. Through Christ, our Lord. Amen.”
* Catholic (Latin). “Nos oremus! Benedic, Domine, nos et hæc Tua dona, quæ de Tua largitate sumus sumpturi. Per Christum, Dominum nostrum. Amen.”
* Catholic (German). “Lass’t uns beten! Segne, Herr, uns und diese deine Gaben, die wir von deiner Großmut essen werden. Durch Christus, unseren Herr’n. Amen.”
* Eastern Orthodox. “O Christ God, bless the food and drink of Thy servants, for holy art Thou, always, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” The one saying the prayer may make the Sign of the Cross over the food with his right hand. After the meal, all stand and sing: “We thank Thee, O Christ our God, that Thou hast satisfied us with Thine earthly gifts; deprive us not of Thy heavenly kingdom, but as Thou camest among Thy disciples, O Saviour, and gavest them peace, come unto us and save us.” syrup.” Hence only bread made of wheat (which embraces spelt) or of barley (which for this purpose includes rye and oats) is deemed worthy of the blessing commanded in verse 10.

After the meal, a series of four (originally three) benedictions are said, or a single benediction if bread was not eaten

Other pre-meal sayings

In Japan it is customary to put one’s hands together and say “Itadakimasu” (‘receive’ humble) before a meal.

Muslims say Bismillah ar-Rahman, ar-Raheem.

Notes

ee also

*grace
*Wilderness Grace

External links

* from The Prayer Guide.
* aricle from “The Catholic Encyclopedia”.
* article from “The Catholic Encyclopedia”.
* .

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

en.academic.ru

Posted by kennethacha in Prayer | 0 comments

In this post, we will tackle an important question that many Christians ask when they are introduced to grace and prayer. Grace posits that everything that we receive from God is because of God’s grace and not because of anything that we do. Everything good that God does, he does because of his grace and because he finds pleasure to do so. He doesn’t do anything because of our great obedience or our great prayers or any other thing that the Christian does. That is a true understanding of God’s grace. But it begs the question that is often asked “If God does what he wants because he wants to do it and not because of anything that a person does, is it important to pray at all?”

The answer is a resounding yes. It is not only important for the believer to pray, but it is critical. Your life depends on prayer, either yours or someone else’ prayer. To live a profitable Christian life, you must first be a person of prayer.

To answer this question thoroughly, we should look at examples of people in the scriptures who preached grace and yet preached praying all the time also. Our understanding of grace comes from the writings in the Bible. If we see that the people that wrote and taught about God’s grace in the Bible also themselves prayed a lot and taught others living under grace to pray, it gives us an idea that grace and prayer must go together. It will not completely answer the question but it will help to point us in the right direction. The two people we should look at here are Jesus Christ and the apostle Paul. We could have looked at other characters featured in the New Testament, but Jesus and Paul are the major ones.

John 1:17 says “For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.” Jesus is in deed the expression or personification of God’s grace to us. God wanted to show us what Grace is so he sent his son to come because Jesus Christ  is grace personified. Instead of describing grace in writing through prophets or sending some sort of picture of what Grace is, God sent Jesus, who is the Grace of God so that we can know Grace. So if you want to know the Grace of God, look at Jesus. Examine him carefully, study him if you want to know the Grace of God. So how did Jesus view prayer?

Jesus prayed a lot. He prayed frequently and even sometimes spent the whole night praying to God. Luke 6:12 records  one of those instances.

“One of those days Jesus went out to a mountainside to pray, and spent the night praying to God.” In Luke 11:1, Jesus taught his disciples to pray. In John 17, Jesus prays what is often called the priestly prayer.
There are at least 27 different references in the New Testament of the Bible where Jesus prays. Prayer was Jesus’ way of life.

Grace came through Jesus Christ who is God’s grace personified. However, the mystery of the gospel of grace to the gentiles (non-Jews) was given to Paul. He wrote 2/3 of the entire New Testament and is the apostle who expounded grace more than everybody else. How did Paul view prayer? Since he taught grace to us, it’s important to see if he thought prayer was important for him to continue to pray even when he was living under grace as we are. If it was important for him, it should be important for us since we are all living under grace. Of all the characters in the New Testament, Paul talks about prayer more than all of them. Paul also talks about grace more than all of them.
In 1 Thessalonians 5:17 Paul commands believers to “pray without ceasing”
In Ephesians 6:18, he writes “And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people”
There are many other instances where Paul prays for others and where he asks others to pray for him. He talks about praying all the time in his letters.

Just to note, the word “pray” occurs 49 times in the New Testament and 109 times in the entire bible according to the New American Standard Bible. That is quite a bit and all those appearances are there to teach us something.

Now that we have established that those who taught grace in the Bible also taught us to pray and also prayed themselves, we now turn to the question and take a second look at it.
Why pray if God does everything by grace? Now, we know that both prayer and grace are necessary and they go together. Grace doesn’t preclude prayer. But for our understanding, we still need to know why these two seemingly paradoxical expressions go together.

We pray not because our prayer puts pressure on God to act but because God in his freedom chose and established that prayer is the means by which he works in the earth. Without prayer, God does nothing in the earth. Everything God does is done through prayer, not out of weakness, but because in his sovereignty, he established that order. That’s why it is true that “no prayer equals no power, little prayer equals little power, much prayer equals much power”

www.whatisgrace.net

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