I samuel 22

i samuel 22

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  David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adulam; and when his brothers and all his father’s house heard, they joined him down there.

א  וַיֵּלֶךְ David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד מִשָּׁם וַיִּמָּלֵט אֶל־מְעָרַת עֲדֻלָּם וַיִּשְׁמְעוּ אֶחָיו וְכָל־בֵּית אָבִיו וַיֵּרְדוּ אֵלָיו שָׁמָּה׃

  Everyone who was in straits and everyone who was in debt and everyone who was desperate joined him, and he became their leader; there were about four hundred men with him.

ב  וַיִּתְקַבְּצוּ אֵלָיו כָּל־אִישׁ מָצוֹק וְכָל־אִישׁ אֲשֶׁר־לוֹ נֹשֶׁא וְכָל־אִישׁ מַר־נֶפֶשׁ וַיְהִי עֲלֵיהֶם לְשָׂר וַיִּהְיוּ עִמּוֹ כְּאַרְבַּע מֵאוֹת אִישׁ׃

  David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David went from there to Mizpeh of Moav Moab (Wikipedia)

Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁 mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‎, Modern mo’av, Tiberian mōʾāḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu’aba, Ma’ba, Ma’ab; Egyptian Mu’ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. The existence of the Kingdom of Moab is attested to by numerous archaeological findings, most notably the Mesha Stele, which describes the Moabite victory over an unnamed son of King Omri of Israel. The Moabite capital was Dibon. According to the Hebrew Bible, Moab was often in conflict with its Israelite neighbours to the west.

“>Moab, and he said to the king of Moav Moab (Wikipedia)

Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁 mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‎, Modern mo’av, Tiberian mōʾāḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu’aba, Ma’ba, Ma’ab; Egyptian Mu’ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. The existence of the Kingdom of Moab is attested to by numerous archaeological findings, most notably the Mesha Stele, which describes the Moabite victory over an unnamed son of King Omri of Israel. The Moabite capital was Dibon. According to the Hebrew Bible, Moab was often in conflict with its Israelite neighbours to the west.

“>Moab, “Let my father and mother come with you, until I know what Hashem will do for me.”

ג  וַיֵּלֶךְ David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד מִשָּׁם מִצְפֵּה Moav Moab (Wikipedia)

Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁 mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‎, Modern mo’av, Tiberian mōʾāḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu’aba, Ma’ba, Ma’ab; Egyptian Mu’ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. The existence of the Kingdom of Moab is attested to by numerous archaeological findings, most notably the Mesha Stele, which describes the Moabite victory over an unnamed son of King Omri of Israel. The Moabite capital was Dibon. According to the Hebrew Bible, Moab was often in conflict with its Israelite neighbours to the west.

“>מוֹאָב וַיֹּאמֶר אֶל־מֶלֶךְ Moav Moab (Wikipedia)

Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁 mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‎, Modern mo’av, Tiberian mōʾāḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu’aba, Ma’ba, Ma’ab; Egyptian Mu’ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. The existence of the Kingdom of Moab is attested to by numerous archaeological findings, most notably the Mesha Stele, which describes the Moabite victory over an unnamed son of King Omri of Israel. The Moabite capital was Dibon. According to the Hebrew Bible, Moab was often in conflict with its Israelite neighbours to the west.

“>מוֹאָב יֵצֵא־נָא אָבִי וְאִמִּי אִתְּכֶם עַד אֲשֶׁר אֵדַע מַה־יַּעֲשֶׂה־לִּי אֱלֹהִים׃

  So he led them to the king of Moav Moab (Wikipedia)

Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁 mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‎, Modern mo’av, Tiberian mōʾāḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu’aba, Ma’ba, Ma’ab; Egyptian Mu’ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. The existence of the Kingdom of Moab is attested to by numerous archaeological findings, most notably the Mesha Stele, which describes the Moabite victory over an unnamed son of King Omri of Israel. The Moabite capital was Dibon. According to the Hebrew Bible, Moab was often in conflict with its Israelite neighbours to the west.

“>Moab, and they stayed with him as long as David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David remained in the stronghold.

ד  וַיַּנְחֵם אֶת־פְּנֵי מֶלֶךְ Moav Moab (Wikipedia)

Moab (/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁 mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‎, Modern mo’av, Tiberian mōʾāḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu’aba, Ma’ba, Ma’ab; Egyptian Mu’ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. The existence of the Kingdom of Moab is attested to by numerous archaeological findings, most notably the Mesha Stele, which describes the Moabite victory over an unnamed son of King Omri of Israel. The Moabite capital was Dibon. According to the Hebrew Bible, Moab was often in conflict with its Israelite neighbours to the west.

“>מוֹאָב וַיֵּשְׁבוּ עִמּוֹ כָּל־יְמֵי הֱיוֹת־David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד בַּמְּצוּדָה׃

  But the Navi Prophet (Wikipedia)

In religion, a prophet is an individual who has claimed to have been contacted by the supernatural or the divine, and to speak for them, serving as an intermediary with humanity, delivering this newfound knowledge from the supernatural source to other people. The message that the prophet conveys is called a prophecy, which transports – at least in Judaism – a message beyond mere pagan soothsaying, augury, divination, or forecasting, and, most prominently in the neviim of the Tanakh, often comprises issues of social justice.

‘>Navi Gad Gad_(son_of_Jacob) (Wikipedia)

Gad (Hebrew: גָּד, Modern Gad, Tiberian Gāḏ; “luck”) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the first son of Jacob and Zilpah, the seventh of Jacob overall, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Gad. However some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation. The text of the Book of Genesis implies that the name of Gad means luck/fortunate, in Hebrew. Classical rabbinical literature argues that the name was a prophetic reference to the manna.

‘>Gad said to David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David, “Do not stay in the stronghold; go at once to the territory of Yehuda.” So David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David left and went to the forest of Hereth.

ה  וַיֹּאמֶר Gad Gad_(son_of_Jacob) (Wikipedia)

Gad (Hebrew: גָּד, Modern Gad, Tiberian Gāḏ; “luck”) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the first son of Jacob and Zilpah, the seventh of Jacob overall, and the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Gad. However some Biblical scholars view this as postdiction, an eponymous metaphor providing an aetiology of the connectedness of the tribe to others in the Israelite confederation. The text of the Book of Genesis implies that the name of Gad means luck/fortunate, in Hebrew. Classical rabbinical literature argues that the name was a prophetic reference to the manna.

‘>גָּד הַנָּבִיא אֶל־David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד לֹא תֵשֵׁב בַּמְּצוּדָה לֵךְ וּבָאתָ־לְּךָ אֶרֶץ Yehudah Judah_(biblical_person) (Wikipedia)

Judah (Hebrew: יְהוּדָה‎‎, Standard Yehuda Tiberian Yəhūḏāh) was, according to the Book of Genesis, the fourth son of Jacob and Leah, the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Judah. By extension, he is indirectly eponymous of the Kingdom of Judah, the land of Judea and the word “Jew”.

‘>יְהוּדָה וַיֵּלֶךְ David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד וַיָּבֹא יַעַר חָרֶת׃

  When Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul heard that David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David and the men with him had been located—Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul was then in Giva, sitting under the tamarisk tree on the height, spear in hand, with all his courtiers in attendance upon him—

ו  וַיִּשְׁמַע Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל כִּי נוֹדַע David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד וַאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר אִתּוֹ וְShaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל יוֹשֵׁב בַּGivah Gibeah (Wikipedia)

Coordinates: 31°49′24″N 035°13′52″E / 31.82333°N 35.23111°E / 31.82333; 35.23111

‘>גִּבְעָה תַּחַת־הָאֶשֶׁל בָּRamah Ramah_in_Benjamin (Wikipedia)

Ramah was a city in ancient Israel in the land allocated to the tribe of Benjamin, whose names means “height”. It was located near Gibeon and Mizpah to the West, Gibeah to the South, and Geba to the East. It has been identified with modern Er-Ram, about 8 km north of Jerusalem.

‘>רָמָה וַחֲנִיתוֹ בְיָדוֹ וְכָל־עֲבָדָיו נִצָּבִים עָלָיו׃

  Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul said to the courtiers standing about him, “Listen, men of Binyamin Benjamin (Wikipedia)

Benjamin was the last-born of Jacob’s thirteen children (12 sons 1 daughter), and the second and last son of Rachel in Jewish, Christian and Islamic tradition. He was the progenitor of the Israelite Tribe of Benjamin. In the Hebrew Bible unlike Rachel’s first son, Joseph, Benjamin was born in Canaan. In the Samaritan Pentateuch, Benjamin’s name appears as “Binyaamem” (Hebrew: בנימין, “Son of my days”). In the Qur’an, Benjamin is referred to as righteous young child, who remained with Jacob when the older brothers plotted against Joseph. Later rabbinic traditions name him as one of four ancient Israelites who died without sin, the other three being Chileab, Jesse and Amram.

“>Binyamin! Will the son of Yishai Jesse (Wikipedia)

Jesse /ˈdʒɛsi/,Isai or Yishai (Hebrew: יִשַׁי, Modern Yishay, Tiberian Yīšáy, meaning “King” or “God exists” or “God’s gift”; Syriac: ܐܝܫܝ‎ Eshai; Greek: Ἰεσσαί Iessai; Latin: Isai, Jesse; Arabic: يَسَّى‎‎ Yassa) is a figure described in the Bible as the father of David, who became the king of the Israelites. His son David is sometimes called simply “Son of Jesse” (Ben Yishai). The role as both father of King David and ancestor of Christ has been used in various depictions in art, e.g. as the Tree of Jesse or in hymns like Behold, a Branch is growing.

“>Yishai give fields and vineyards to every one of you? And will he make all of you captains of thousands or captains of hundreds?

ז  וַיֹּאמֶר Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל לַעֲבָדָיו הַנִּצָּבִים עָלָיו שִׁמְעוּ־נָא בְּנֵי יְמִינִי גַּם־לְכֻלְּכֶם יִתֵּן בֶּן־יִשַׁי שָׂדוֹת וּכְרָמִים לְכֻלְּכֶם יָשִׂים שָׂרֵי אֲלָפִים וְשָׂרֵי מֵאוֹת׃

  Is that why all of you have conspired against me? For no one informs me when my own son makes a pact with the son of Yishai Jesse (Wikipedia)

Jesse /ˈdʒɛsi/,Isai or Yishai (Hebrew: יִשַׁי, Modern Yishay, Tiberian Yīšáy, meaning “King” or “God exists” or “God’s gift”; Syriac: ܐܝܫܝ‎ Eshai; Greek: Ἰεσσαί Iessai; Latin: Isai, Jesse; Arabic: يَسَّى‎‎ Yassa) is a figure described in the Bible as the father of David, who became the king of the Israelites. His son David is sometimes called simply “Son of Jesse” (Ben Yishai). The role as both father of King David and ancestor of Christ has been used in various depictions in art, e.g. as the Tree of Jesse or in hymns like Behold, a Branch is growing.

“>Yishai; no one is concerned for me and no one informs me when my own son has set my servant in ambush against me, as is now the case.”

ח  כִּי קְשַׁרְתֶּם כֻּלְּכֶם עָלַי וְאֵין־גֹּלֶה אֶת־אָזְנִי בִּכְרָת־בְּנִי עִם־בֶּן־יִשַׁי וְאֵין־חֹלֶה מִכֶּם עָלַי וְגֹלֶה אֶת־אָזְנִי כִּי הֵקִים בְּנִי אֶת־עַבְדִּי עָלַי לְאֹרֵב כַּיּוֹם הַזֶּה׃

ט  וַיַּעַן דֹּאֵג הָאֲדֹמִי וְהוּא נִצָּב עַל־עַבְדֵי־Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל וַיֹּאמַר רָאִיתִי אֶת־בֶּן־יִשַׁי בָּא נֹבֶה אֶל־Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>אֲחִימֶלֶךְ בֶּן־אֲחִטוּב׃

  He inquired of Hashem on his behalf and gave him provisions; he also gave him the sword of Goliath the Philistine.”

י  וַיִּשְׁאַל־לוֹ בַּיהֹוָה וְצֵידָה נָתַן לוֹ וְאֵת חֶרֶב גָּלְיָת הַפְּלִשְׁתִּי נָתַן לוֹ׃

  Thereupon the king sent for the Kohen Kohen (Wikipedia)

Kohen or cohen (or kohain; Hebrew: כֹּהֵן‎, “priest”, pl. כֹּהֲנִים‎ kohanim) is the Hebrew word for priest used colloquially in reference to the Aaronic priesthood. Jewish kohanim are traditionally believed and halakhically required to be of direct patrilineal descent from the biblical Aaron. The term is colloquially used in Orthodox Judaism in reference to modern day descendants of Aharon, brother of Moses.

“>Kohen Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>Achimelech son of Achituv and for all the Kohanim belonging to his father’s house at Nov. They all came to the king,

יא  וַיִּשְׁלַח הַמֶּלֶךְ לִקְרֹא אֶת־Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>אֲחִימֶלֶךְ בֶּן־אֲחִיטוּב הַKohen Kohen (Wikipedia)

Kohen or cohen (or kohain; Hebrew: כֹּהֵן‎, “priest”, pl. כֹּהֲנִים‎ kohanim) is the Hebrew word for priest used colloquially in reference to the Aaronic priesthood. Jewish kohanim are traditionally believed and halakhically required to be of direct patrilineal descent from the biblical Aaron. The term is colloquially used in Orthodox Judaism in reference to modern day descendants of Aharon, brother of Moses.

“>כֹּהֵן וְאֵת כָּל־בֵּית אָבִיו הַכֹּהֲנִים אֲשֶׁר בְּנֹב וַיָּבֹאוּ כֻלָּם אֶל־הַמֶּלֶךְ׃

  and Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul said, “Listen to me, son of Achituv.” “Yes, my lord,” he replied.

יב  וַיֹּאמֶר Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל שְׁמַע־נָא בֶּן־אֲחִיטוּב וַיֹּאמֶר הִנְנִי אֲדֹנִי׃

  And Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul said to him, “Why have you and the son of Yishai Jesse (Wikipedia)

Jesse /ˈdʒɛsi/,Isai or Yishai (Hebrew: יִשַׁי, Modern Yishay, Tiberian Yīšáy, meaning “King” or “God exists” or “God’s gift”; Syriac: ܐܝܫܝ‎ Eshai; Greek: Ἰεσσαί Iessai; Latin: Isai, Jesse; Arabic: يَسَّى‎‎ Yassa) is a figure described in the Bible as the father of David, who became the king of the Israelites. His son David is sometimes called simply “Son of Jesse” (Ben Yishai). The role as both father of King David and ancestor of Christ has been used in various depictions in art, e.g. as the Tree of Jesse or in hymns like Behold, a Branch is growing.

“>Yishai conspired against me? You gave him food and a sword, and inquired of Hashem for him—that he may rise in ambush against me, as is now the case.”

va-YO-mer ay-LAV Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>sha-UL LA-mah k’-shar-TEM a-LAI a-TAH u-ven Yishai Jesse (Wikipedia)

Jesse /ˈdʒɛsi/,Isai or Yishai (Hebrew: יִשַׁי, Modern Yishay, Tiberian Yīšáy, meaning “King” or “God exists” or “God’s gift”; Syriac: ܐܝܫܝ‎ Eshai; Greek: Ἰεσσαί Iessai; Latin: Isai, Jesse; Arabic: يَسَّى‎‎ Yassa) is a figure described in the Bible as the father of David, who became the king of the Israelites. His son David is sometimes called simply “Son of Jesse” (Ben Yishai). The role as both father of King David and ancestor of Christ has been used in various depictions in art, e.g. as the Tree of Jesse or in hymns like Behold, a Branch is growing.

“>yi-SHAI b’-ti-t’-KHA LO LE-khem v’-KHE-rev v’-sha-OL LO bay-lo-HEEM la-KUM ay-LAI l’-o-RAYV ka-YOM ha-ZEH

יג  וַיֹּאמֶר אלו Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל לָמָּה קְשַׁרְתֶּם עָלַי אַתָּה וּבֶן־Yishai Jesse (Wikipedia)

Jesse /ˈdʒɛsi/,Isai or Yishai (Hebrew: יִשַׁי, Modern Yishay, Tiberian Yīšáy, meaning “King” or “God exists” or “God’s gift”; Syriac: ܐܝܫܝ‎ Eshai; Greek: Ἰεσσαί Iessai; Latin: Isai, Jesse; Arabic: يَسَّى‎‎ Yassa) is a figure described in the Bible as the father of David, who became the king of the Israelites. His son David is sometimes called simply “Son of Jesse” (Ben Yishai). The role as both father of King David and ancestor of Christ has been used in various depictions in art, e.g. as the Tree of Jesse or in hymns like Behold, a Branch is growing.

“>יִשָׁי בְּתִתְּךָ לוֹ לֶחֶם וְחֶרֶב וְשָׁאוֹל לוֹ בֵּאלֹהִים לָקוּם אֵלַי לְאֹרֵב כַּיּוֹם הַזֶּה׃

  Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>Achimelech replied to the king, “But who is there among all your courtiers as trusted as David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David, son-in-law of Your Majesty and obedient to your bidding, and esteemed in your household?

יד  וַיַּעַן Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>אֲחִימֶלֶךְ אֶת־הַמֶּלֶךְ וַיֹּאמַר וּמִי בְכָל־עֲבָדֶיךָ כְּדָוִד נֶאֱמָן וַחֲתַן הַמֶּלֶךְ וְסָר אֶל־מִשְׁמַעְתֶּךָ וְנִכְבָּד בְּבֵיתֶךָ׃

  This is the first time that I inquired of Hashem for him; I have done no wrong. Let not Your Majesty find fault with his servant with any of my father’s house; for your servant knew nothing whatever about all this.”

טו  הַיּוֹם הַחִלֹּתִי לשאול־ לוֹ בֵאלֹהִים חָלִילָה לִּי אַל־יָשֵׂם הַמֶּלֶךְ בְּעַבְדּוֹ דָבָר בְּכָל־בֵּית אָבִי כִּי לֹא־יָדַע עַבְדְּךָ בְּכָל־זֹאת דָּבָר קָטֹן אוֹ גָדוֹל׃

  But the king said, “You shall die, Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>Achimelech, you and all your father’s house.”

טז  וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ מוֹת תָּמוּת Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>אֲחִימֶלֶךְ אַתָּה וְכָל־בֵּית אָבִיךָ׃

  And the king commanded the guards standing by, “Turn about and kill the Kohanim of Hashem, for they are in league with David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David; they knew he was running away and they did not inform me.” But the king’s servants would not raise a hand to strike down the Kohanim of Hashem.

יז  וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ לָרָצִים הַנִּצָּבִים עָלָיו סֹבּוּ וְהָמִיתוּ כֹּהֲנֵי יְהֹוָה כִּי גַם־יָדָם עִם־David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד וְכִי יָדְעוּ כִּי־בֹרֵחַ הוּא וְלֹא גָלוּ אֶת־אזנו וְלֹא־אָבוּ עַבְדֵי הַמֶּלֶךְ לִשְׁלֹחַ אֶת־יָדָם לִפְגֹעַ בְּכֹהֲנֵי יְהֹוָה׃

  Thereupon the king said to Doeg, “You, Doeg, go and strike down the Kohanim.” And Doeg Ha’adomi Doeg_the_Edomite (Wikipedia)

Doeg (Hebrew: דּוֹיֵג‎‎ Dō’êḡ) was an Edomite, chief herdsman to Saul, King of Israel.

‘>Doeg Ha’adomi went and struck down the Kohanim himself; that day, he killed eighty-five men who wore the linen ephod.

יח  וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ לדויג סֹב אַתָּה וּפְגַע בַּכֹּהֲנִים וַיִּסֹּב דויג הָאֲדֹמִי וַיִּפְגַּע־הוּא בַּכֹּהֲנִים וַיָּמֶת בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא שְׁמֹנִים וַחֲמִשָּׁה אִישׁ נֹשֵׂא אֵפוֹד בָּד׃

  He put Nov, the town of the Kohanim, to the sword: men and women, children and infants, oxen, asses, and sheep— to the sword.

יט  וְאֵת נֹב עִיר־הַכֹּהֲנִים הִכָּה לְפִי־חֶרֶב מֵאִישׁ וְעַד־אִשָּׁה מֵעוֹלֵל וְעַד־יוֹנֵק וְשׁוֹר וַחֲמוֹר וָשֶׂה לְפִי־חָרֶב׃

  But one son of Achimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>Achimelech son of Achituv escaped—his name was Evyatar—and he fled to David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David.

כ  וַיִּמָּלֵט בֵּן־אֶחָד לַAchimelech Ahimelech (Wikipedia)

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אחימלך “the king is brother”), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Sam. 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Sam. 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron’s son Ithamar and the high priest Eli. In 1 Chr. 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Sam. 14:3, 18). He was the twelfth High Priest, and officiated at Nob, where he was visited by David (he gave David and his companions five loaves of the showbread) when David fled from Saul (1 Sam. 21:1-9). He was summoned into Saul’s presence, and accused of disloyalty for assisting David, on the information of Doeg the Edomite. Then the king commanded that he, with the other priests who stood beside him, 86 in all, should be slain with his family. This sentence was carried into execution by Doeg in the most cruel manner (1 Sam. 22:9-23). Possibly Abiathar had a son also called Ahimelech, or the two names, as some think, may have been accidentally transposed in 2 Sam. 8:17; 1 Chr. 18:16, marg.; 24:3, 6, 31.

“>אֲחִימֶלֶךְ בֶּן־אֲחִטוּב וּשְׁמוֹ אֶבְיָתָר וַיִּבְרַח אַחֲרֵי דָוִד׃

  When Evyatar told David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David that Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul had killed the Kohanim of Hashem,

כא  וַיַּגֵּד אֶבְיָתָר לְדָוִד כִּי הָרַג Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל אֵת כֹּהֲנֵי יְהֹוָה׃

  David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>David said to Evyatar, “I knew that day, when Doeg Ha’adomi Doeg_the_Edomite (Wikipedia)

Doeg (Hebrew: דּוֹיֵג‎‎ Dō’êḡ) was an Edomite, chief herdsman to Saul, King of Israel.

‘>Doeg Ha’adomi was there, that he would tell Shaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>Shaul. I am to blame for all the deaths in your father’s house.

כב  וַיֹּאמֶר David David (Wikipedia)

David (/ˈdeɪvɪd/; Hebrew: דָּוִד, Modern David, Tiberian Dāwîḏ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ Davíd; Latin: Davidus, David) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah, reigning in c. 1010–970 BCE.

“>דָּוִד לְאֶבְיָתָר יָדַעְתִּי בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא כִּי־שָׁם דויג הָאֲדֹמִי כִּי־הַגֵּד יַגִּיד לְShaul Saul (Wikipedia)

Saul (/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Šāʼûl; “asked for, prayed for”; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎‎, Ṭālūt or Arabic: شاؤل‎‎, Sha’ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE, marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.

“>שָׁאוּל אָנֹכִי סַבֹּתִי בְּכָל־נֶפֶשׁ בֵּית אָבִיךָ׃

  Stay with me; do not be afraid; for whoever seeks your life must seek my life also. It will be my care to guard you.”

כג  שְׁבָה אִתִּי אַל־תִּירָא כִּי אֲשֶׁר־יְבַקֵּשׁ אֶת־נַפְשִׁי יְבַקֵּשׁ אֶת־נַפְשֶׁךָ כִּי־מִשְׁמֶרֶת אַתָּה עִמָּדִי׃

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theisraelbible.com

i samuel 22

Thanks to the date on my last blog I have realized that I missed a lot of days. Here’s why. (That

“Here’s why”

was for Pastor Bob, who clearly reads my blog, as evidenced by his sermons that “coincidentally” say the same thing (totally kidding (how many embedded parentheses can I have? (ok last one ))))

Well, the biggest reason for the gap is that school is back in session, and my focusing ability is totally depleted during the day, by the five cutest students in the world, leaving my nights (when I usually type out my devo blog) completely devoid of the ability to form a coherent sentence. But another reason, would be that I seem to have had a case of the Januaries. I know I am not alone, because I have confessed this “Blah” feeling to some of my closest friends, only to hear many of them echo my sentiments. Oppressed seems like a strong word, but yet it is the right word. This past week I felt somewhat better, despite circumstances around me getting worse. However, in the middle of it, if you have ever been there, and are in charge of or responsible for anyone else, it’s easy to feel unqualified, defeated, thinking “How do I take care of my children, or students, or coworkers, or fill in the blank….when I don’t even feel like taking care of myself?”

So I decided today that I wasn’t going to let another day go by without digging into the word. And while the kids were playing on the play set at the park, I pulled out my phone and started reading. (that’s right lady judging me at the park for being on my phone….I was reading the BIBLE!) 😉 So I began reading and read this:

 David therefore departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adullam. So when his brothers and all his father’s house heard it, they went down there to him. 2 And everyone who was in distress, everyone who was in debt, and everyone who was discontented gathered to him. So he became captain over them. And there were about four hundred men with him.

David was running for his life, trying to cling to a promise that was given to him, betrayed by his master, separated from his best friend, and crying out to God regularly for protection. Yet in this broken state, they came to him, those that were discontented, and in debt, and distressed. And he became captain over them. How? How did he do it? He was anointed to do it. He was chosen to do it. He was empowered to do it. He was surrendered to God’s will. And he chose to do it.

 I could relate. There are those days, too many lately, where I felt like I was struggling to take care of myself properly, yet here they came, the distressed, the indebted, and the discontent, needing me to be their captain.  So I pray that as we stand before the Lord, possibly feeling like we have nothing left to give, that we would realize we never had anything to give in the first place. That is through Him and Him alone that we do anything good. So by the power of His Holy Spirit, there is nothing we cannot do.


5 Now the prophet Gad said to David, “Do not stay in the stronghold; depart, and go to the land of Judah.” So David departed and went into the forest of Hereth.

Regardless of how little David was in control, he was still in control of whether or not he chose to obey. And here he does. He receives council from one of the prophets and acts on it.

The end of the chapter gruesomely recounts the consequences of David’s lies to the priest. Saul hears from a man that was there and witnessed the priest aiding a deceitful and desperate David. He reports to Saul all that happened and many are killed because of it.

The

last chapter

we saw how our victories in Christ empower us for even bigger victories in the future. However this chapter reminds us that our disobedience

also

has far reaching consequences into the future. Our society tries to deny this reality. We as Christians also can pretend this is not true. Sometimes we think that we can pray away the disastrous results to our bad choices and sins. We are forgiven. That is for sure. But our decisions have consequences. I pray that our eyes would be opened to those sinful decisions we are making….pride, covetousness, blasphemy, lust…..those commandments being broken, and that we would take them seriously, knowing also that we serve a just and loving God, who longs to be gracious to us.

Isaiah 30:18 Therefore the LORD longs to be gracious to you, And therefore He waits on high to have compassion on you. For the LORD is a God of justice; How blessed are all those who long for Him.

theapologista.blogspot.com
Parallel Verses

New American Standard Bible

“I was also blameless toward Him, And I kept myself from my iniquity.

King James Version

I was also upright before him, and have kept myself from mine iniquity.

Holman Bible

I was blameless before Him and kept myself from sinning.

International Standard Version

I have been innocent before him, and I’ve kept myself from incurring guilt.

A Conservative Version

I was also perfect toward him, and I kept myself from my iniquity.

American Standard Version

I was also perfect toward him; And I kept myself from mine iniquity.

Amplified

I was also blameless before Him and kept myself from guilt and iniquity.

Bible in Basic English

And I was upright before him, and I kept myself from sin.

Darby Translation

And I was upright before him, And kept myself from mine iniquity.

Jubilee 2000 Bible

And I was perfect before him and have kept myself from my iniquity.

Julia Smith Translation

And I will be blameless to him, and I shall be washed from mine iniquity.

King James 2000

I was also upright before him, and have kept myself from my iniquity.

Lexham Expanded Bible

I was blameless before him, and I kept myself from my iniquity.

Modern King James verseion

I was also upright before Him, and have kept myself from my iniquity.

Modern Spelling Tyndale-Coverdale

But was pure unto him ward, and kept myself from wickedness.

NET Bible

I was blameless before him; I kept myself from sinning.

New Heart English Bible

I was also perfect toward him. I kept myself from my iniquity.

The Emphasized Bible

So became I blameless towards him, – and kept myself from mine iniquity:

Webster

I was also upright before him, and have kept myself from my iniquity.

World English Bible

I was also perfect toward him. I kept myself from my iniquity.

Youngs Literal Translation

And I am perfect before Him, And I keep myself from mine iniquity.

bible.knowing-jesus.com

David’s Song of Praise

1David sang to the Lord the words of this song when the Lord delivered him from the hand of all his enemies and from the hand of Saul. 2 He said:

“The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer;

3     my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge,    my shield and the horn of my salvation.He is my stronghold, my refuge and my savior—    from violent people you save me.

4 “I called to the Lord, who is worthy of praise,

    and have been saved from my enemies.5 The waves of death swirled about me;    the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me.6 The cords of the grave coiled around me;    the snares of death confronted me.

7 “In my distress I called to the Lord;

    I called out to my God.From his temple he heard my voice;    my cry came to his ears.8 The earth trembled and quaked,    the foundations of the heavens shook;    they trembled because he was angry.9 Smoke rose from his nostrils;    consuming fire came from his mouth,    burning coals blazed out of it.10 He parted the heavens and came down;    dark clouds were under his feet.11 He mounted the cherubim and flew;    he soared on the wings of the wind.12 He made darkness his canopy around him—    the dark rain clouds of the sky.13 Out of the brightness of his presence    bolts of lightning blazed forth.14 The Lord thundered from heaven;    the voice of the Most High resounded.15 He shot his arrows and scattered the enemy,    with great bolts of lightning he routed them.16 The valleys of the sea were exposed    and the foundations of the earth laid bareat the rebuke of the Lord,    at the blast of breath from his nostrils.

17 “He reached down from on high and took hold of me;

    he drew me out of deep waters.18 He rescued me from my powerful enemy,    from my foes, who were too strong for me.19 They confronted me in the day of my disaster,    but the Lord was my support.20 He brought me out into a spacious place;    he rescued me because he delighted in me.

21 “The Lord has dealt with me according to my righteousness;

    according to the cleanness of my hands he has rewarded me.22 For I have kept the ways of the Lord;    I am not guilty of turning from my God.23 All his laws are before me;    I have not turned away from his decrees.24 I have been blameless before him    and have kept myself from sin.25 The Lord has rewarded me according to my righteousness,    according to my cleanness in his sight.

26 “To the faithful you show yourself faithful,

    to the blameless you show yourself blameless,27 to the pure you show yourself pure,    but to the devious you show yourself shrewd.28 You save the humble,    but your eyes are on the haughty to bring them low.29 You, Lord, are my lamp;    the Lord turns my darkness into light.30 With your help I can advance against a troop;    with my God I can scale a wall.

31 “As for God, his way is perfect:

    The Lord’s word is flawless;    he shields all who take refuge in him.32 For who is God besides the Lord?    And who is the Rock except our God?33 It is God who arms me with strength    and keeps my way secure.34 He makes my feet like the feet of a deer;    he causes me to stand on the heights.35 He trains my hands for battle;    my arms can bend a bow of bronze.36 You make your saving help my shield;    your help has made me great.37 You provide a broad path for my feet,    so that my ankles do not give way.

38 “I pursued my enemies and crushed them;

    I did not turn back till they were destroyed.39 I crushed them completely, and they could not rise;    they fell beneath my feet.40 You armed me with strength for battle;    you humbled my adversaries before me.41 You made my enemies turn their backs in flight,    and I destroyed my foes.42 They cried for help, but there was no one to save them—    to the Lord, but he did not answer.43 I beat them as fine as the dust of the earth;    I pounded and trampled them like mud in the streets.

44 “You have delivered me from the attacks of the peoples;

    you have preserved me as the head of nations.People I did not know now serve me,45     foreigners cower before me;    as soon as they hear of me, they obey me.46 They all lose heart;    they come trembling from their strongholds.

47 “The Lord lives! Praise be to my Rock!

    Exalted be my God, the Rock, my Savior!48 He is the God who avenges me,    who puts the nations under me,49     who sets me free from my enemies.You exalted me above my foes;    from a violent man you rescued me.50 Therefore I will praise you, Lord, among the nations;    I will sing the praises of your name.

51 “He gives his king great victories;

    he shows unfailing kindness to his anointed,    to David and his descendants forever.”

www.biblica.com

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