Men of prayer

Welcome to my website, it only deals with  JFK Assassination research findings, mostly about Prayer Man, the happenings inside and around the Texas School Book Depository, Oswald’s interrogations and inside the DPD and the search for the Wiegman and Darnell films on Nov 22nd 1963.

This site contains witness testimony and documentation from TSBD employees that were present during the assassination of JFK. Alongside with agents of the DPD, FBI and the Secret Service to complete the overall picture. The site is under constant construction while I gradually add text,  media and documents, I do not expect this site to be fully functional until late Summer 2020.

Every day I learn new stuff and need to process this, not just for the papers I produce, but also this site and the next movies. The next movies will be made in four instalments. There is just too much now to cram it in one feature. It is more than likely that I will make short clips.

If you are a regular visitor and wish to see what has been added since your last visit then I suggest to check out the updates page.

There are various galleries to browse through (use the filter system to narrow down your search) and a diary with my musings.

The first version of a presentation captured in HD 1080 pixels  Prayer Man: More Than Just A Fuzzy Picture.

The next instalment of this movie will be in various parts and will show a lot of updated and brand new content resulting in a narrative told in much greater detail!

The four 4 instalments will be.

1/ Anatomy of the 2nd floor lunch room encounter.   

2/ Anatomy of Lee Harvey Oswald’s interrogations.

3/ TSBD.

4/ Prayer Man.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This site is for research purposes only, all images and text are used solely for the research of the JFK Assassination.

www.prayer-man.com

If you attend a local church, you may have an opportunity to nominate and elect men to serve in leadership positions like elder or deacon. It’s nearing that time at my church and as my pastor spoke about it last week, the first thing he said was that we were searching for “men of prayer” to serve.

What a thing to list as the first qualifications for leadership in our churches. And yet how often to do we neglect what prayer really means in our lives? When we consider prayer as a one way call to God to let him know about what we need, we reduce prayer something so much less than it could and is is intended to be. Nehemiah is a great example of what it means to be a man (or person) of prayer. So what can we learn from Nehemiah?

Before undertaking anything, give it to God in prayer.

When Nehemiah heard about the condition of his homeland while serving in the court of a foreign king, he brought his heartbreak to God.  In fact, he spent days before God as he “mourned and fasted and prayed” (Nehemiah 1:4). He begged God to remember His people and give Nehemiah success in pursuing the rebuilding in Jerusalem.

A man of prayer knows his broken state.

In the same prayer where Nehemiah was fasting and mourning, he also confessed his wrong-doing to God. In verse 6 of chapter 1, he said, “I confess the sings we Israelites including myself and my father’s house, have committed against you.” There’s was nothing that Nehemiah had done that could convince God to help him. He knew that, and yet even in his lowly brokenness, he came before God to ask for his help, in spite of his sin.

Prayer doesn’t equal inaction.  

Sometimes we tell others to “commit it to God in prayer.” And what we mean is, “pray about it and stop doing anything.” Admittedly, we can often make things worse when we try to handle it on our own instead of waiting for God.  But just because we’re praying about it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be busy while we wait. When the Israelites were being threatened with attacks while rebuilding the wall, Nehemiah said, “But we prayed to our God and posted a guard day and night to meet this threat.” (Neh. 4:9)

Are we ready to give everything to God? Are we ready to repent before God? Are we ready to wait and God while still doing what He has called us to do? If you are ready to be a person of prayer whose trust is in God, then get really ready. Because you never know what God will do in, through, and around you when you pray.

myfaithradio.com

Welcome to Men of Valor and Prayer, or MVP Ministry.  MVP is a grassroots men’s ministry, founded by a group of Saskatoon Christian men, who have a desire to impact the spiritual climate of the city.  We have different backgrounds and attend different churches, but we are united by the desire to serve God, follow Jesus Christ and to see other men do the same.

Our vision is of Men stepping forward to take responsibility for their families, their church, their community and their land.

Men need to be taught, supported and encouraged to be the men that God created them to be.  However, in order to step forward to serve as a Man of God, men need to address and deal with our own weaknesses, issues and sins.

MVP can assist churches and men by

1) being a point of contact and network for men and churches, sharing information about what is happening for men across the city.

2) providing leadership for city-wide men’s events and opportunities, providing opportunities for men to connect, be challenged and grow.

3) provide assistance and support to churches seeking to grow their ministry to men.

menofvalorandprayer.com

If you attend a local church, you may have an opportunity to nominate and elect men to serve in leadership positions like elder or deacon. It’s nearing that time at my church and as my pastor spoke about it last week, the first thing he said was that we were searching for “men of prayer” to serve.

What a thing to list as the first qualifications for leadership in our churches. And yet how often to do we neglect what prayer really means in our lives? When we consider prayer as a one way call to God to let him know about what we need, we reduce prayer something so much less than it could and is is intended to be. Nehemiah is a great example of what it means to be a man (or person) of prayer. So what can we learn from Nehemiah?

  1. Before undertaking anything, give it to God in prayer. When Nehemiah heard about the condition of his homeland while serving in the court of a foreign king, he brought his heartbreak to God.  In fact, he spent days before God as he “mourned and fasted and prayed” (Nehemiah 1:4). He begged God to remember His people and give Nehemiah success in pursuing the rebuilding in Jerusalem.
  2. A man of prayer knows his broken state.  In the same prayer where Nehemiah was fasting and mourning, he also confessed his wrong-doing to God. In verse 6 of chapter 1, he said, “I confess the sings we Israelites including myself and my father’s house, have committed against you.” There’s was nothing that Nehemiah had done that could convince God to help him. He knew that, and yet even in his lowly brokenness, he came before God to ask for his help, in spite of his sin.
  3. Prayer doesn’t equal inaction.  Sometimes we tell others to “commit it to God in prayer.” And what we mean is, “pray about it and stop doing anything.” Admittedly, we can often make things worse when we try to handle it on our own instead of waiting for God.  But just because we’re praying about it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be busy while we wait. When the Israelites were being threatened with attacks while rebuilding the wall, Nehemiah said, “But we prayed to our God and posted a guard day and night to meet this threat.” (Neh. 4:9)

Are we ready to give everything to God? Are we ready to repent before God? Are we ready to wait and God while still doing what He has called us to do? If you are ready to be a person of prayer whose trust is in God, then get really ready. Because you never know what God will do in, through, and around you when you pray.

life973.com

Оценка 5 проголосовавших: 1
ПОДЕЛИТЬСЯ

ОСТАВЬТЕ ОТВЕТ

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here