Daily strength gambling

Daily Strength for the Battle Vol 1

Training for Spiritual Excellence

The Daily Strength for the Battle Series is written for anyone who wants to strengthen their walk with God. Originally begun 15 years ago for military warriors going through tough training at a combat training center, these devotionals quickly proved to have wide appeal. Military family members and civilians from all walks of life have expressed their appreciation for the powerful biblical lessons shared in a brief, practical, and interesting style.

You, God’s Word, 5 minutes.

Chapters in this volume include:

  1. Trials – Overcoming Giants in your Life
  2. Wisdom and Guidance – Crossroads Experiences
  3. Obedience: Doing the Harder Right
  4. Salvation: Not My Strength
  5. Standing Strong: Onward, Christian Soldier
  6. Setting the Example: Faithful to the End
  7. Caring for Others: The Buck Stops Here

Daily Strength for the Battle Vol 2

Fortifying your Spiritual Foundation

Building and maintaining a strong spiritual foundation is not easy, especially if major repairs are in order. Similar to remodeling a house, it usually takes longer, costs more, and gets messy before it’s over. And there are no shortcuts.

The Scriptures promise that tough times will only get tougher. Survival will not hinge on the size of your bank account, your job title, or your reputation in the community. What matters will be your relationship with Christ and your foundation in God’s Word.

Be assured of this. If you seek God through His Word, pray, and follow His ways to the best of your ability, the Lord promises you will see good results. You will mature and be effective in your Christian walk. I pray that this devotional will be a blessing to you.

Chapters in this volume include:

  1. Knowing God’s Word
  2. Controlling Your Thoughts
  3. Growing Through Prayer
  4. Learning Submission
  5. Serving Others
  6. Knowing Your Enemy
  7. Growing Through Relationships

Daily Strength for the Battle Vol 3

Builiding Resilient Marriages and Families

Divorce rates for military couples generally match those of the rest of American society. We do know that since 9/11 the huge numbers of married soldiers deploying has resulted in a noticeable spike in divorce within the military. Despite focused attention by military leaders, efforts have not achieved the desired outcomes. In matters relating to marriage and family, brave warriors and their families seem to succumb to the same issues that plague the rest of American society.

Statistics fail to tell the whole story. What about the quality of life that exists within marriages and families that do survive? Are couples happily married and raising healthy families, or are husbands and wives simply holding on for dear life in an effort to get the children raised?

Marriage is challenging, and so is raising a family. It has always been this way. I encourage you, however, to set your goals much higher than mere survival and to believe that you can succeed in both areas far beyond your present level. God says.

Chapters in this volume include:

  1. Commitment: Marriage Built On The Rock
  2. Communication: Give it Your Best
  3. Finances: Handling Wealth
  4. Faith and the Family: If You Can?
  5. Handling Conflict: Make it a Fair Fight
  6. Children: Children Belong to God
  7. Priorities & Balance: Keep the Big Picture

Daily Strength for the Battle Vol 4

Navigating Life’s Storms

Do you find that life today seems to have more trouble and difficulties than just a few years ago? We all have family and friends who are trying to navigate through some kind of a storm.

These storms are impacting us in ways that are not always easy to spot, at least initially. Increasingly, people across our country are manifesting signs that stress has invaded their lives in harmful ways. We all know people, maybe family members, whose lives have been hijacked by various addictions: video games, pornography, gambling, and even social media. And it’s not slowing down.

Lord, I pray that each person who reads this devotional will turn to you in his or her time of trouble. As they do, may you grant them the wisdom, courage, and comfort they need to handle the stress in ways that honor you. Amen.

Chapters in this volume include:

  1. Perspective: Storms Will Come
  2. Many Causes, Many Responses
  3. Negative Impacts
  4. Positive Impacts
  5. Warriors Have Needs
  6. Choices
  7. Future Possibilities

dailystrengthforthebattle.com

1. Take a Short Break

When you wake up, make a decision that you will not gamble, just for this one day. If you have to do this an hour at a time, that is okay. Some might have to work one minute at a time, which is fine too, as long as you promise yourself that you will not gamble, and you keep the promise. Schedule your day in a very structured way so you do not have a lot of free time. Forbid yourself from entering a casino, downloading online gaming apps, or visiting gaming websites.

2. Find a Replacement Activity

Find something to replace your gambling. Exercise, go shopping, go out with friends, or do some cooking. You can also rent a movie, listen to some music, or do some reading — do whatever it takes to keep yourself busy. You could pick up a new, exciting hobby, like bike racing or climbing or welding.

Your goal is to stop gambling, and it is not easy when you get such a high from it. Finding replacements, however, can help. Try and see how it goes.

3. Remember How Bad It Feels to Lose

Remember the feeling when you lose a lot of money at the casino, online, or through sports betting. Allow yourself to feel that despondency when you are having thoughts about gambling again. You may find that you are less likely to go out and place a bet. I have done this before, and must admit that these feelings have stopped me from taking that ride to the casino. This hasn’t worked every time, but many times this tool has helped.

4. Educate Yourself About Gambling Addiction

Read as much as you can about gambling addiction. Educate yourself, especially about your particular type of gambling. Find out what type of gambler you are and whether you have a gambling problem and have crossed over this invisible line. Are you an escape or an action gambler? Find out what some of your triggers are, as this can help a lot. When you read about gambling addiction, especially the power that it can have on your psyche, you may think twice about going out and placing a bet.

The resources at the end of this article may be of some help to you.

5. Find Self-Help Materials

Seek help. Look for books or courses. Self-hypnosis for gambling problems can also be helpful. Consider joining an online gambling addiction forum. Even if you do not join, reading other people’s stories may help you realize that you are not alone. It is crucial that you realize that you are not the only person with this problem. Many share your plight and are looking for answers and support from other gamblers.

Again, there are resources at the bottom of this article that may be of some help to you.

6. Find a Support Group

Attend a Gamblers Anonymous meeting for group support. If you do not want to do a 12-Step program, there is an online program called Smart Recovery. Having support from other gamblers who also want to quit is an important piece of your recovery. Just talking about gambling with other people who understand what you’re going through can be really helpful.

7. Hand Over Control of Your Money

Ask a close family member to handle your money. If you do not have money on your person, you will be less apt to impulsively gamble money away. It will be hard, but it is an important step in your recovery. Also, do not allow yourself access to ATM or credit cards. Just keep a small amount of cash with you, so you cannot spend the money gambling.

8. List the Cons of Gambling and the Pros of Quitting

Make a list about how your gambling problem has affected your life in a negative way. Write as much as you can. Make the list on the left side of a sheet of paper so you have room on the right side. On the right side, write about how your life will change for the better when you stop gambling.

9. Make a Financial Plan

Talk to a debt counselor about your gambling debts. Ask for advice about how to relieve financial pressure and solve financial problems caused by your gambling. The financial stress that you have from gambling addiction debts can drive you back to gambling if not addressed. Financial problems are the biggest consequence of gambling, and help is available. Be sure to use a non-profit debt assistance agency, and not one that is for-profit.

10. Get a Good Counselor

See a counselor that specializes in addictions, especially gambling, and talk to this person about your problem. If your addiction is severe, you will need as much support as you can get to stop gambling now.

11. Get Help for Underlying Mood Disorders

Many people with a gambling problem also suffer from depression, anxiety, stress, or other substance abuse issues. These can both trigger compulsive gambling as well as make it worse.

12. Get in the Right Environment

Surround yourself with people that you trust who want to see you recover and avoid any kind of environment where you might be tempted to gamble, which could be anything from a casino, to being at home alone with your smartphone. Delete gambling apps from your phone and tell casinos that you have a problem and that you want them to block you from entering.

Some Final Thoughts

Gambling is a dangerous addictions because of the related risk of suicide. Find help now and make a plan to begin quitting. Take it one day, or hour, at a time and keep in mind how great you will feel when you have come clean and stopped gambling with your life.

healdove.com

daily strength gambling

DailyStrength is a new social network that provides a space for people with a wide variety of medical, psychological and life conditions to discuss their struggles and the treatments they are undergoing. While any number of wannabe social networks are likely to spring up in coming years seeking to cash in on medical activity online, this isn’t one of those. DailyStrength has the executive team and feature set to be a real player. I think it’s a great example of a niche social network that provides topical value ads and executes the basics well too.

The site was founded by Doug Hirsch, one of the first employees at Yahoo! and most recently at Facebook. The site’s look and feel is somewhat similar to both of those companies’ products. Hirsch says that most niche social networks pick an audience, but people online are mostly concerned with sex, money and their health. He says that health networking is a vastly under served market.

DailyStrength uses the term “community” where some people might use “condition,” and that could be appreciated by people who don’t care for experiences like blindness or deafness being referred to as a disease. Note too that the site uses the word “preview” instead of Beta. I know some people will like that.

The highlight of DailyStrength is that users are asked to describe medical and psychological treatments they have undergone. They indicate what conditions those treatments were for, whether they were effective and provide a narrative about the experience. That information is then aggregated by condition and treatment – so it’s easy to see what a large number of people have done in response to a condition or what it’s really like to undergo a certain treatment. Some communities are better populated so far than others, the erectile dysfunction community for example doesn’t have anyone in it yet (in case you were wondering).

Have you been thinking about using Lexapro? Out of 58 people who have used it on DailyStrength, only 45% found it helpful. That’s interesting information, presuming the complainers aren’t employees of a competing drug company or PR firm.

The discussion and support function is likely to prove quite valuable to users as well. I know from talking to my friend Nancy White about the March of Dimes project she helped set up called Share Your Story that medical social networking and blogging can be a huge success.

There are 25,000 treatments in the database so far. Each treatment and condition has a discussion space, syndicated Yahoo! news and an excerpt from the Wikipedia entry on the subject. The company pays four medical doctors to participate on the site and DailyStrength is careful to advise against or delete medical recommendations posted by users. Hirsch told me that many doctors he’s spoken with are fully supportive of the site as it’s a way for patients to educate themselves before and after visiting a medical office. The site also has a resources section where you can find, for example, a long list of user contributed recipes for gluten free food.

There’s already a fair amount of activity on the site, lots of people offering each other support. The site is primarily targeting women, Hirsch says that seeing 75% of Facebook’s traffic come from women taught him that was the prime audience for social networks.

In the coming weeks the company will be partnering with third party services to offer chat, video and better photo sharing. Ad revenues will be split between DailyStrength and condition specific charities that will be voted on by users. Hirsch says he’s on the fence about big pharma and will likely focus on seeking ad dollars from more “wellness” oriented advertisers.

Everyone says that women, health, community and informational resources are important factors in the future of the web – of course women are more than just a consumer market, hopefully they can be equal participants in building the new web. I think that DailyStrength is a well constructed and useful site engaging with those market segments.
daily strength gambling

techcrunch.com
How to Stop Gambling and Regain Control of Your Life

It can happen to anyone from any walk of life: Your gambling goes from a fun, harmless diversion to an unhealthy obsession with serious consequences. Whether you bet on sports, scratch cards, roulette, poker, or slots—in a casino, at the track, or online—a gambling problem can strain your relationships, interfere with work, and lead to financial disaster. You may even do things you never thought you would, like running up huge debts or even stealing money to gamble. Although it can feel like you’re unable to stop, there are plenty of things you can do to overcome a gambling problem, repair your relationships and finances, and finally regain control of your life.

What is gambling addiction and problem gambling?

Gambling addiction—also known as—pathological gambling, compulsive gambling or gambling disorder—is an impulse-control disorder. If you’re a compulsive gambler, you can’t control the impulse to gamble, even when it has negative consequences for you or your loved ones. You’ll gamble whether you’re up or down, broke or flush, and you’ll keep gambling regardless of the consequences—even when you know that the odds are against you or you can’t afford to lose.

Of course, you can also have a gambling problem without being totally out of control. Problem gambling is any gambling behavior that disrupts your life. If you’re preoccupied with gambling, spending more and more time and money on it, chasing losses, or gambling despite serious consequences in your life, you have a gambling problem.

A gambling addiction or problem is often associated with other behavior or mood disorders. Many problem gamblers also suffer with substance abuse issues, unmanaged ADHD, stress, depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder. To overcome your gambling problems, you’ll also need to address these and any other underlying causes as well. The first step is to separate the myths from the facts about gambling problems:

Myths & Facts about Gambling Problems

Myth: You have to gamble every day to be a problem gambler. Fact: A problem gambler may gamble frequently or infrequently. Gambling is a problem if it causes problems.

Myth: Problem gambling is not really a problem if the gambler can afford it. Fact: Problems caused by excessive gambling are not just financial. Too much time spent on gambling can also lead to relationship and legal problems, job loss, mental health problems including depression and anxiety, and even suicide.

Myth: Having a gambling problem is just a case of being weak-willed, irresponsible, or unintelligent. Fact: Gambling problems affect people of all levels of intelligence and all backgrounds. Previously responsible and strong-willed people are just as likely to develop a gambling problem as anyone else.

Myth: Partners of problem gamblers often drive their loved ones to gamble. Fact: Problem gamblers often try to rationalize their behavior. Blaming others is one way to avoid taking responsibility for their actions, including what is needed to overcome the problem.

Myth: If a problem gambler builds up a debt, you should help them take care of it. Fact: Quick fix solutions may appear to be the right thing to do. However, bailing the gambler out of debt may actually make matters worse by enabling their gambling problems to continue.

Gambling addiction signs and symptoms

Gambling addiction is sometimes referred to as a “hidden illness” because there are no obvious physical signs or symptoms like there are in drug or alcohol addiction. Problem gamblers also typically deny or minimize the problem—even to themselves. However, you may have a gambling problem if you:

Feel the need to be secretive about your gambling. You might gamble in secret or lie about how much you gamble, feeling others won’t understand or that you will surprise them with a big win.

Have trouble controlling your gambling. Once you start gambling, can you walk away? Or are you compelled to gamble until you’ve spent your last dollar, upping your bets in a bid to win lost money back?

Gamble even when you don’t have the money. You may gamble until you’ve spent your last dollar, and then move on to money you don’t have—money to pay bills, credit cards, or things for your children. You may feel pushed to borrow, sell, or even steal things for gambling money.

Have family and friends worried about you. Denial keeps problem gambling going. If friends and family are worried, listen to them carefully. It’s not a sign of weakness to ask for help. Many older gamblers are reluctant to reach out to their adult children if they’ve gambled away their inheritance, but it’s never too late to make changes for the better.

Self-help for gambling problems

The biggest step to overcoming a gambling addiction is realizing that you have a problem. It takes tremendous strength and courage to own up to this, especially if you have lost a lot of money and strained or broken relationships along the way. Don’t despair, and don’t try to go it alone. Many others have been in your shoes and have been able to break the habit and rebuild their lives. You can, too.

Learn to relieve unpleasant feelings in healthier ways. Do you gamble when you’re lonely or bored? Or after a stressful day at work or following an argument with your spouse? Gambling may be a way to self-soothe unpleasant emotions, unwind, or socialize. But there are healthier and more effective ways of managing your moods and relieving boredom, such as exercising, spending time with friends who don’t gamble, taking up new hobbies, or practicing relaxation techniques.

Strengthen your support network. It’s tough to battle any addiction without support, so reach out to friends and family. If your support network is limited, there are ways to make new friends without relying on visiting casinos or gambling online. Try reaching out to colleagues at work, joining a sports team or book club, enrolling in an education class, or volunteering for a good cause.

Join a peer support group. Gamblers Anonymous, for example, is a twelve-step recovery program patterned after Alcoholics Anonymous. A key part of the program is finding a sponsor, a former gambler who has experience remaining free from addiction and can provide you invaluable guidance and support.

Seek help for underlying mood disorders. Depression, stress, substance abuse, or anxiety can both trigger gambling problems and be made worse by compulsive gambling. Even when gambling is no longer a part of your life, these problems will still remain, so it’s important to address them.

How to stop gambling for good

For many problem gamblers, it’s not quitting gambling that’s the biggest challenge, but rather staying in recovery—making a permanent commitment to stay away from gambling. The Internet has made gambling far more accessible and, therefore, harder for recovering addicts to avoid relapse. Online casinos and bookmakers are open all day, every day for anyone with a smartphone or access to a computer. But maintaining recovery from gambling addiction or problem gambling is still possible if you surround yourself with people to whom you’re accountable, avoid tempting environments and websites, give up control of your finances (at least at first), and find healthier activities to replace gambling in your life.

Making healthier choices

One way to stop gambling is to remove the elements necessary for gambling to occur in your life and replace them with healthier choices. The four elements needed for gambling to continue are:

A decision: For gambling to happen, you need to make the decision to gamble. If you have an urge: stop what you are doing and call someone, think about the consequences to your actions, tell yourself to stop thinking about gambling, and find something else to do immediately.

Money: Gambling cannot occur without money. Get rid of your credit cards, let someone else be in charge of your money, have the bank make automatic payments for you, close online betting accounts, and keep only a limited amount of cash on you.

Time: Even online gambling cannot occur if you don’t have the time. Schedule enjoyable recreational time for yourself that has nothing to do with gambling. If you’re gambling on your smartphone, find other ways to fill the quiet moments during your day.

A game: Without a game or activity to bet on there is no opportunity to gamble. Don’t put yourself in tempting environments. Tell gambling establishments you frequent that you have a gambling problem and ask them to restrict you from entering. Remove gambling apps and block gambling sites on your smartphone and computer.

Finding alternatives to gambling

Maintaining recovery from gambling addiction depends a lot on finding alternative behaviors you can substitute for gambling. Some examples include:

Reason for gambling Sample substitute behaviors
To provide excitement, get a rush of adrenaline Sport or a challenging hobby, such as mountain biking, rock climbing, or Go Kart racing
To be more social, overcome shyness or isolation Counseling, enroll in a public speaking class, join a social group, connect with family and friends, volunteer, find new friends
To numb unpleasant feelings, not think about problems Try therapy or use HelpGuide’s free Emotional Intelligence toolkit
Boredom or loneliness Find something you’re passionate about such as art, music, sports, or books and then find others with the same interests
To relax after a stressful day As little as 15 minutes of daily exercise can relieve stress. Or deep breathing, meditation, or massage
To solve money problems The odds are always stacked against you so it’s far better to seek help with debts from a credit counselor

Dealing with gambling cravings

Feeling the urge to gamble is normal, but as you build healthier choices and a strong support network, resisting cravings will become easier. When a gambling craving strikes:

Avoid isolation. Call a trusted family member, meet a friend for coffee, or go to a Gamblers Anonymous meeting.

Postpone gambling. Tell yourself that you’ll wait 5 minutes, fifteen minutes, or an hour. As you wait, the urge to gamble may pass or become weak enough to resist.

Visualize what will happen if you give in to the urge to gamble. Think about how you’ll feel after all your money is gone and you’ve disappointed yourself and your family again.

Distract yourself with another activity, such as going to the gym, watching a movie, or practicing a relaxation exercise for gambling cravings.

Coping with lapses

If you aren’t able to resist the gambling craving, don’t be too hard on yourself or use it as an excuse to give up. Overcoming a gambling addiction is a tough process. You may slip from time to time; the important thing is to learn from your mistakes and continue working towards recovery.

Gambling addiction treatment

Overcoming a gambling problem is never easy and seeking professional treatment doesn’t mean that you’re weak in some way or can’t handle your problems. But it’s important to remember that every gambler is unique so you need a recovery program tailored specifically to your needs and situation. Talk to your doctor or mental health professional about different treatment options, including:

Inpatient or residential treatment and rehab programs. These are aimed at those with severe gambling addiction who are unable to avoid gambling without round-the-clock support.

Treatment for underlying conditions contributing to your compulsive gambling, including substance abuse or mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, OCD, or ADHD. This could include therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes. Problem gambling can sometimes be a symptom of bipolar disorder, so your doctor or therapist may need to rule this out before making a diagnosis.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy. CBT for gambling addiction focuses on changing unhealthy gambling behaviors and thoughts, such as rationalizations and false beliefs. It can also teach you how to fight gambling urges and solve financial, work, and relationship problems caused by problem gambling. Therapy can provide you with the tools for coping with your addiction that will last a lifetime.

Family therapy and marriage, career, and credit counseling. These can help you work through the specific issues that have been created by your problem gambling and lay the foundation for repairing your relationships and finances.

How to help someone stop gambling

If your loved one has a gambling problem, you likely have many conflicting emotions. You may have spent a lot of time and energy trying to keep your loved one from gambling or having to cover for them. At the same time, you might be furious at your loved one for gambling again and tired of trying to keep up the charade. Your loved one may have borrowed or even stolen money with no way to pay it back. They may have sold family possessions or run up huge debts on joint credit cards.

While compulsive and problem gamblers need the support of their family and friends to help them in their struggle to stop gambling, the decision to quit has to be theirs. As much as you may want to, and as hard as it is seeing the effects, you cannot make someone stop gambling. However, you can encourage them to seek help, support them in their efforts, protect yourself, and take any talk of suicide seriously.

Preventing suicide in problem gamblers

When faced with the consequences of their actions, problem gamblers can suffer a crushing drop in self-esteem. This is one reason why there is a high rate of suicide among compulsive gamblers. If you suspect your loved one is feeling suicidal, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in the U.S. at 1-800-273-8255 or visit Befrienders Worldwide to find a suicide helpline in your country.

Four tips for family members:

  1. Start by helping yourself. You have a right to protect yourself emotionally and financially. Don’t blame yourself for the gambler’s problems or let his or her addiction dominate your life. Ignoring your own needs can be a recipe for burnout.
  2. Don’t go it alone. It can feel so overwhelming coping with a loved one’s gambling addiction that it may seem easier to rationalize their requests “this one last time.” Or you might feel ashamed, feeling like you are the only one who has problems like this. Reaching out for support will make you realize that many families have struggled with this problem.
  3. Set boundaries in managing money. To ensure the gambler stays accountable and to prevent relapse, consider taking over the family finances. However, this does not mean you are responsible for micromanaging the problem gambler’s impulses to gamble. Your first responsibilities are to ensure that your own finances and credit are not at risk.
  4. Consider how you will handle requests for money. Problem gamblers often become very good at asking for money, either directly or indirectly. They may use pleading, manipulation, or even threats to get it. It takes practice to ensure you are not enabling your loved one’s gambling addiction.
Do’s and Don’ts for partners of problem gamblers
Do…
  • Seek the support of others with similar problems; attend a self-help group for families such as Gam-Anon
  • Explain problem gambling to the children
  • Recognize your partner’s good qualities
  • Remain calm when speaking to your partner about their gambling and its consequences
  • Let your partner know that you are seeking help for your own sake because of the way gambling affects you and the family
  • Understand the need for treatment of problem gambling despite the time it may involve
  • Take control of family finances; review bank and credit card statements
Don’t…
  • Preach, lecture, or allow yourself to lose control of your anger
  • Make threats or issue ultimatums unless you intend to carry them out
  • Exclude the gambler from family life and activities
  • Expect immediate recovery, or that all problems will be resolved when the gambling stops
  • Bail out the gambler
  • Cover-up or deny the existence of the problem to yourself, the family, or others
Source: Dept. of Health & Addiction Services

Authors: Jeanne Segal, Ph.D., Melinda Smith, M.A., and Lawrence Robinson. Last updated: November 2018.

www.helpguide.org

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